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08/07/2011: Philippines featured in Smithsonian Folk Life Festival; Filipino participants call on Ambassador Cuisia

Eight students from the Rehoboth Children’s Home in Tarlac, Philippines who will perform in the Smithsonian Folk Life Festival met with Philippine Ambassador to the US Jose L. Cuisia (sixth from right). They are joined by Rehoboth Executive Director Amelia Tuquero (fifth from right) and Peace Corps volunteers Tom Ferrebee (third from right) and Leah Ferrebee (second row, left most).

Eight students from the Rehoboth Children’s Home in Tarlac, Philippines who will perform in the Smithsonian Folk Life Festival met with Philippine Ambassador to the US Jose L. Cuisia (sixth from right). They are joined by Rehoboth Executive Director Amelia Tuquero (fifth from right) and Peace Corps volunteers Tom Ferrebee (third from right) and Leah Ferrebee (second row, left most).

08 July 2011, Washington, DC – Young Filipinos from the Rehoboth Children’s Home in Camiling, Tarlac in the Philippines called on Philippine Ambassador to the US Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. today. They are currently in Washington, DC to conduct a series of performances in the annual Smithsonian Folk Life Festival.

The two-week international exposition at the National Mall features diverse living cultural heritage and attracts at least one million people.

Filipinos from Rehoboth Children’s Home in Tarlac, Philippines dance the tinikling at the Smithsonian Folk Life Festival. Tinikling depicts the movement of a bird called tikling that is trying to escape the traps made by farmers. A guest from the audience tries to learn how to dance the tinikling at the Smithsonian Folk Life Festival at the National Mall.

Left photo: Filipinos from Rehoboth Children’s Home in Tarlac, Philippines dance the tinikling at the Smithsonian Folk Life Festival. Tinikling depicts the movement of a bird called tikling that is trying to escape the traps made by farmers.

Right photo: A guest from the audience tries to learn how to dance the tinikling at the Smithsonian Folk Life Festival at the National Mall.

The Rehoboth residents are performing Tinikling at the World Stage and are teaching guests to cook Filipino food like adobo and pancit and play Filipino games such as tumbang preso. The Philippines is part of the Peace Corps segment of the festival. The Peace Corps is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year.

The Philippines is one of the first three countries that hosted Peace Corps volunteers in 1961. The Rehoboth residents were accompanied to the US by Rehoboth Children’s Home Executive Director Ms. Amelia L. Tuquero and Peace Corps volunteers in Rehoboth Tom and Leah Ferrebee.

Ambassador Cuisia noted, “The Peace Corps program contributes in the strengthening of relations not just between two countries but between peoples as well. Peace Corps volunteers live among Filipinos in the provinces and they experience genuine Filipino warmth and hospitality. At the same time, they give valuable assistance to social, environmental and livelihood programs.”

More than 8,000 Americans have served in the Philippines as Peace Corp volunteers in the past fifty years. - END